Lifestyle

Sleep: 3 Reasons It Is Vitally Important to Your Overall Health

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For decades, experts in the fields of medicine and psychology have been urging people to improve their sleep habits. Advice ranging from the importance of bedtime routines to the perfect amount of rest for your age group has been circulated for years. However, few individuals fully understand the influence our slumber habits have on our overall health. Amazingly, a recent study found drivers receiving less than the prescribed amount of rest were as bad as drunk drivers.

It seems like the busier our lives become, the more likely we are to forfeit the benefits of naps and a goodnight’s rest. Nevertheless, we here at the Texas Hill Country have scoured the internet to compile this list of three reasons you should make sure sleep is one of your top priorities.

1. Rest Plays an Important Role in Forming Memories

Sleep affects how well we make memories

Photo: Pixabay

Remember back in your college days when you stayed up all night studying for that final exam? Or perhaps, more recently, you struggled to get comfortable and fell asleep long after your usual bedtime. It turns out those late night study sessions and sleepless nights may have done more harm than good.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, our brains actually do a lot of work while we are sleeping. When we are sleep deprived, our brain is unable to synthesize new information, making it difficult for us to remember things that might be important such as a new supervisor’s name or a bill’s due date.

2. Without Sleep, Your Heart Cannot Work Correctly

Heart Pulse Monitor

Photo: Pixabay

The American Sleep Association estimates that in order to be fully rested,  adults require at least seven hours of rest. Unfortunately, the association reports that most adults slumber less than the recommended amount each night.

In 2016, the American Heart Association issued a statement addressing sleep deprivation and the effects it has on heart health. It showed that after only one night of insufficient rest, the blood pressure of overall healthy adults rose noticeably. Additionally, when at rest muscles, including the heart, are able to repair themselves. An interrupted sleep pattern deprives the cardiovascular system of this important “refresher” function, which in turn can lead to heart disease and stroke.

3. Lack of Sleep Can Lead to Weight Gain

weight gain attributed to lack of sleep
Photo: Pixabay

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