Nature

7 Most Dangerous Creatures Native to Texas According to Houston Museum of Natural Science

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The Houston Museum of Natural Science has released its list of the most dangerous creatures in Texas which are native to the Lone Star State. The museum’s Cockrell Butterfly Center recently provided the list of seven in total which they acknowledge should be avoided if at all possible, and if you must be a fan of these species, do so from a from a distance.

Seven Most Dangerous Creatures Native to Texas According to Houston Museum of Natural Science

Photo: Flickr/Marshal Hedin

The Center would normally go out of its way to inspire enthusiasm in entomology, but recognizing that generally, bugs trigger a fear mechanism in many humans, and moreover, wanting to share the real and true dangers of these particular creatures, they encourage those that cross their paths to keep on walking. They preface their list with the advice to “use caution and common sense” in all instances where contact comes into play but respectfully suggest you respect each creature’s space and keep your hands clear of them.

Seven Most Dangerous Creatures Native to Texas According to Houston Museum of Natural Science

Photo: Pixabay

Not listed in any specific order according to danger level or priority, the seven most dangerous creatures which are native to Texas list as follows: Southern Black Widow Spider, Asp Caterpillar, Brown Recluse Spider, Texas Red-Headed Centipede, Striped Bark Scorpion, Kissing Bugs, and the Eastern Velvet Ant. Although many Texans, not to mention state visitors, will already have a kill-first-ask-questions-later policy, readers are reminded that within the natural food chain, such creatures do complete a purpose, such as the consumption of other equally distasteful creatures (en masse sometimes) and so without one, we might possibly have an increase in another. The best policy to date is to avoid, respect their space, and walk away where possible.

Sources:

Houston Museum of Natural Science

Houston Chronicle

East Texas Matters