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Austin, Texas: A Literary Destination Worth Adding to Your Bookish Bucket List

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What are the makings of a literary destination? Many a reader may seek out the hometowns of their favorite authors, or the local setting in a true story. Some might consider a humungous bookstore a literary destination in itself, adding it to one of their Texas travel bucket lists. As lifelong readers or lovers of books, you may have your own concept of what makes a true literary destination, but here are some great debate points on why you should add Austin to this very list.

Bookstores Abound

Austin, Texas: A Literary Destination Worth Adding to Your Bookish Bucket List

Photo: Wikipedia

Readers revel in the fact that Austin is home to a cornucopia of independent, chain, and used bookstores, in all shapes and sizes. There’s also a good chance you might catch a reading by one of your favorite authors on any given day/evening. And speaking of authors, one of the city’s best-known historic structures in the literary world is the downtown Austin cottage (William Sidney Porter House) where O. Henry lived in the 1890’s! They hold several literary events throughout the year, including the annual Pun-Off World Championships in May.

The Texas Book Festival

Austin, Texas: A Literary Destination Worth Adding to Your Bookish Bucket List

Photo: Wikimedia

Scheduled for November of this year, the Texas Book Festival in Austin will feature festival co-founder Laura Bush together with her daughter Jenna Bush Hager. The pair co-authored Our Great Big Backyard, celebrating the centennial of the National Park Service. Close to 300 writers ranging from celebrity chefs to up-and-coming novelists, internet stars to political writers, and even comedians will be on hand at the event this year.

It’s a University Town

Austin, Texas: A Literary Destination Worth Adding to Your Bookish Bucket List

Photo: Wikimedia

The city of Austin’s rich history of post-secondary learning means that many can find amazing bookish and literary destinations resulting from it. As an example, a renowned collection of rare books and manuscripts can be found at the University of Texas’ Harry Ransom Center for the Humanities (i.e. a Gutenberg Bible and three copies of a 1623 collection of Shakespeare’s plays) which is open to the public for tours. Just one of many literary destinations linked directly to the city’s higher learning history.

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