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Who Fits In? A 2-Part Topic on Regional Cities in the Texas Hill Country (Part II, San Antonio)

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We began this 2-part topic on who fits in the Texas Hill Country with the city of Austin last week. As we had hoped, a number of you weighed in with your wonderful feedback and comments. Up for debate/response was the concept of whether or not a city truly blends into the meat and potatoes of the Hill Country. Made up of many counties, small towns, farming communities, and wonderfully eclectic, historic, and artsy communities, the debate came to a head when you (the reader) pondered what the many layers of our populace are made up of in our region. And so, part two of this discussion focuses on the city of San Antonio. Do you feel that, as a city, it’s truly a part of the Texas Hill Country?

Who Fits In the Texas Hill Country: A 2-Part Topic on Regional Cities (Part II, San Antonio)

Photo: Flickr/Katie Haugland Bowen

We broke it down for readers last week in noting that our audience appeared to be made of two sides: one that truly loved the city, and one that truly seemed to despise it. In this instance, however, there seems to be a blurring of lines. As a media group, it’s rare to recall a time when a post about the actual city of San Antonio was ever mistreated by our readers en masse, whereas with the former example, we don’t have enough fingers and toes to keep up. San Antonio has its wonderful history, its appealing tourism, and its own unique traits that have practically endeared it to the fans of our page. Is this still the case? And what differentiates it from the city of Austin so much within a matter of 80 miles?

Who Fits In the Texas Hill Country: A 2-Part Topic on Regional Cities (Part II, San Antonio)

Photo: Wikimedia

Often times, San Antonio is referred to as a “gateway” of sorts to the Texas Hill Country. Folks from smaller communities might beg to disagree with that statement. If so, on what basis would this city, like any other in Texas, not be considered a true part of the region. What would preclude it from being so? Where clear lines were drawn in part one of this topic were the social ideologies of the population. It was agreed that on a map, and by all integral components of geography, Austin was a Hill Country member, but its social makeup was up for debate. With San Antonio, the discussion may vary completely. Again, we welcome your comments and feedback in this friendly conversation. What’s your opinion?

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