History

Time Travel to Late 1800s Texas Hill Country

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The Barrera property, at 26090 Toutant Beauregard Road in Leon Springs, is a feast for historical aesthetics. In addition to the myriad of top-notch sculpture on the property, there are several meticulously restored buildings, which originated in 1860. On July 6, 2011, this site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Originally purchased in 1856, nine acres remain of the original 171 acres homesteaded by William Heidemann, originally from Prussia. The land remained in the Heidemann family for 137 years until 1993, when Mrs. Jewell Heidemann sold the property to the Barrera family. Carefully restored over the course of two years, with materials and salvage found mostly onsite, this land retains the feel of living in Bexar County in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Blast from the Past

Photo courtesy of HomeTowninMyRearview

The dog-trot log house is a three room structure with six sash windows and was situated to receive the best breezes. Beyond the house is the limestone barn, flanked by a wood frame addition.

Cozy sleeping

Photo courtesy of HomeTowninMyRearview

Utilitarian features of this farm are also well preserved, including a limestone water well and a smokehouse, which is windowless, with soot-blackened walls and intact racks where meats were hung. The Heidemann family cemetery is also located on the property.

Still charred

Photo courtesy of HomeTowninMyRearview

The current residence is a rock house built in the 1930s, with a covered porch and a decorative wrought iron fence. Constructed in the 1950s, the postwar asbestos shingle-sided workshop is comprised of ammunition crates and sits within an enclosed building which houses Mr. Barrera’s tidbits for future projects. Inside the workshop is a step back in time, complete with immense radios, old magazines, and dusty tools.

It smells like you think
Photo courtesy of HomeTowninMyRearview

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