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Dr. Death: The Texas Surgeon Who Paralyzed his Patients

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In the span of two years, Dr. Death a.k.a. Christopher Duntsch performed operations on 38 patients in Texas, botching 35 of them, according to the Dallas Observer. The surgeries included two fatalities and either paralysis or serious injury for many others. Duntsch’s career started off on a high note, graduating from a top-tier medical school and becoming a member of the Alpha Omega Medical Honor Society, but in a matter of only a short time, something went disastrously wrong.

Despite his successes, which included running two labs and raising millions in medical grants, those who were close with him say his life began to spiral as early as 2006. A former girlfriend of one of Duntsch’s friends witnessed him take LSD and prescription painkillers on his birthday and keeping cocaine on his home office dresser. She also witnessed a night of partying at which Duntsch took both drugs after which he proceeded to don his lab coat to go to work. The result: from 2011 to 2013, his patients in the Dallas, Texas, area were waking after surgery experiencing horrible pain, sometimes numbness and even paralysis. In at least two instances, his patients died due to surgical complications, leading to the ominous Dr. Death nickname Duntsch would receive over the course of the investigation.

Dr. Death: The Texas Surgeon Who Paralyzed his Patients

Photo: Pixabay.com

Although it had been revealed that Duntsch had been required to attend an impaired physician program following his refusal to take a drug test, he was still allowed to finish his residency and was eventually recruited to Texas from Tennessee in the summer of 2011. Shortly thereafter, he managed a deal with Plano’s Baylor Regional Medical Center, and granted surgical rights. So began the two-year stretch of surgical complications that marked his work in the Lone Star State. How did he manage to continue luring patients despite botched procedures? His counterparts say his extreme confidence was integral. As an example, fellow surgeon Dr. Mark Hoyle, having worked with Duntsch during one of the sub-standard surgeries, told D Magazine that Duntsch would make tremendously conceited statements such as: “Everybody is doing it wrong. I’m the only clean minimally invasive guy in the whole state.”

Dr. Death: The Texas Surgeon Who Paralyzed his Patients
Photo: Pixabay.com

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