Nature

Fishing on a Beautiful Spring Morning on the Highland Lakes

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There is something magical about an early spring morning on the Highland Lakes in the Texas Hill Country. The Colorado river is quietly running, only interrupted with the whir of the motor on a stray fisherman’s boat.  As the welcoming sun rises and begins to thaw the frost that covers the river banks, tiny bluebonnets lift their purple-hooded blossoms toward the sky and spread their leaves out over the dirt. Huisache perfumes the air with small yellow blossoms that belie their thorny branches.  And birds begin the long trek north, stopping to drink, to bathe and to eat anything that dares to poke out of the ground early.

A lone heron fishes by the side of the bank staring down into the clear waters for the occasional perch or bass. The white bass are running up river to spawn and begin the cycle of life over again.  My husband and I have headed out for the spawn of whites.  He’s intent on fishing for the sake of releasing because it’s more about the sport and the quiet and the relaxation than the dinner.  I’m content to sit in the boat, watching, absorbing. The coffee in my mug steams upward in small spirals as I hear the whiz of fishing line being launched and kerplunking into the water.

Fishing on a Beautiful Spring Morning on the Highland Lakes
Photo: Facebook/Laura Goldenschue

Concentric circles ripple out from where the bait landed and we watch for a tug on the line.  Its still and quiet.  A far cry from the summer sounds of jet skis, water skiers and cigarette boats that we have during the busy summer.

I love the Colorado in early spring.  Its almost as if we own the river, except for a turtle that claims a fallen log in an abandoned cove, sunning itself and warming its insides after a long fight against the bitter cold.  Soon the mountain laurels will be spilling grape soda into the air. There’s a vibrant fresh green on all the trees that line the bank; new green, spring green, light and bright leaves exacerbated by the rains that have cleared the air of the oak and cedar pollen.

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