History

Top 5 Thanksgiving Day Parades Around the Nation

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Detroit, home to historic Woodward Avenue, and a Thanksgiving Parade that is a holiday tradition that dates back to 1924.

Each year, thousands of spectators line the streets of this historic avenue to set their sites on some of the “larger than life floats, colorful helium-filled balloons, thunderous marching bands, and exciting specialty acts!” shares its website.

The streets of historic Woodward Avenue come to life with beloved costume characters that come to life, bands that are sure to inspire a kick in your step, but the favorite, according to travelchannel.com, is “the paper-mache artifacts known simply as the “Big Heads.” They look like walking bobbleheads that honor world cultures, legendary singers, actors, and historical figures of the past.

5. Annual H-E-B Holiday Parade (Houston)

Thanksgiving Day Parade

Photo: Facebook.com/Thegreensheet

Everything is bigger in Texas, so it’s fitting that one the best parades to catch in person or on TV is the traditional HEB Thanksgiving Day Parade. According to the City of Houston’s website,”The Houston Thanksgiving Day Parade began in 1949 when Santa arrived at Union Station and rode his sleigh to the downtown Foley’s.” The parade has gone through a few names over the course of its history, with the Foley’s Thanksgiving Day Parade being among one of them.

Even though the name has changed over the years, the tradition and excitement the parade brings are unlike no other. The floats, marching bands, clowns, costume characters, are bigger and better in Texas, most would agree. Tom the Turkey is a favorite among the floats along with Santa making his way along the route to welcome the start of the holiday season. It’s a 68-year-old tradition that marches through the streets of downtown Houston with generations of young and old alike taking in the sights and sounds. The broadcast can be seen live throughout Texas Thanksgiving morning.