Lifestyle

Dallas Named the 26th Safest City in the World by ‘The Economist’

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Dallas was ranked number 26 in The Economists’ Safe Cities Index for 2017. Sixty cities all over the world were ranked across 49 indicators covering digital security, health security, infrastructure security, and personal security. It could be considered rather impressive that Dallas ranked as high as it did.

Dallas is the Fourth Most Populated Metropolitan Area in the U.S.

Dallas

Photo: Flickr/Daxis

Dallas is the most populous city in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, which is the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the United States. The city’s population ranks ninth in the U.S. and third in Texas after Houston and San Antonio. The city’s prominence arose from its historical importance as a center for the oil and cotton industries, and its position along numerous railroad lines.

World’s Urban Population has Increased by 150 Million Since 2015

world's population

Photo: Unsplash/mauro mora

According to The Economist, since 2015, the world’s urban population is estimated to have grown by more than 150 million people, raising the total number of people living in cities to above 4 billion. More than 90 percent of the increase in urbanization over this period occurred in the developing world, where massive migration from rural areas has continued to accelerate. In the developed world, however, the size of most cities remained roughly the same, with some cities even beginning to shrink in those countries with aging and declining populations.

Dallas’ Infrastructure is a Weakness

Dallas infrastructure
Photo: Flickr/Adam Simmons

All seven cities listed in North America are in the top half of the overall rankings but many underperform their developed country peers in key areas. New York, for example, ranks 31st in health security, with Dallas (29th) faring only slightly better. Dallas is also in the bottom half of the infrastructure security category, a category in which Chicago (27th) and Washington, D.C. (28th) are relatively weak as well. The decaying state of infrastructure in the U.S. has long been a subject of debate in the country. The index shows that the debate has yet to translate into much action.

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