Lifestyle

Creating a Drought and Heat-Resistant Hill Country Garden

By  | 

 

If you have a passion for bluebonnets and sweet autumn sage, then you’re in luck. Gardens in parts of the Hill Country are required to be partially drought and heat-resistant, and as such, if you’re going to plant, you’ll need to look at species that can survive these conditions. Native plant species will become better established each year, as well as simply look stunning in your yard. Indian blanket, in gorgeous shades of gold, orange, and red does well in full sun and heat. Plants such as prairie verbena grows strong in the hot sun and soil which has a mixture of gravel. It also blooms in a beautiful purple and magenta. Not only that, but the red bird of paradise can sustain itself well in drought conditions, known to grow up to 10 feet in height, with fern-like tropical foliage and orange/red flowers. Here are some more ways and reasons to create a drought and heat-resistant Hill Country garden!

Creating a Drought and Heat-Resistant Hill Country Garden

Photo: envato elements

Look toward other examples of gardens in drought and heat conditions to determine similar fashions to follow and seek out plant species that thrive in low rainfall. It makes no sense to pour tons of water on plants that aren’t native to the Hill Country in an effort to have them do well. But it doesn’t mean you’re giving up on having nice garden. It simply means you’ll be more ethical about it.

Creating a Drought and Heat-Resistant Hill Country Garden

Photo: envato elements

The aforementioned bluebonnets and sweet autumn sage, in addition to witch-hazel, four-nerve daisy, coral honeysuckle, and Texas pistachio trees all do well in heat and drought conditions, and are the perfect place for bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies to land, rest, or eat (depending on their diets). And considering this year’s Monarch migration and its plummeting population, they’ll welcome a restful spot to find some refuge along the way.

Creating a Drought and Heat-Resistant Hill Country Garden

Photo: envato elements

Plants that are hardier and low-maintenance suit the Texas Hill Country to a “T.” They are less time consuming, water- and care-intensive, and require fewer special soils and fertilizers. Plants such as cacti, hardy grasses, trees and shrubs can handle the Hill Country heat and are often not very appetizing for deer! Ask your local garden center what they might recommend and work with the local conditions and native plant species that will do best in them.