Nature

The ‘Houston Toad’ is Now Critically Endangered

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The Houston toad needs human help. Since the 1960s, the Houston toad has faced hardships. During that time, the combination of a big drought and booming city growth lead to the amphibian losing footing on its home. Now, Chron.com reports that the creature scientifically known as “Anaxyrus houstonensis” may be pushed from the whole planet unless conservation efforts improve.

An estimated 2,000 Houston toads are still left. Texas State University biologist Michael Forstner told Chron.com that it’s possible to help this creature make a comeback. “This is the Houston toad’s time. It is a native Texan. We don’t have many of those kinds of ‘only here’ animals in our state,” he said.

What makes this amphibian so perfectly primed to get off of the critically endangered list? Forstner says it’s partly because it’s such an easy being to get along with. He explains, “It doesn’t eat sheep or people, it doesn’t require coordinating conservation abroad (migratory birds) or even across states. It is tolerant of us so long as we want to live in the type of places that represent its habitat.”

Hopefully, the native Houston toad gains more attention and comes back from the brink of extinction.