Lifestyle

How One Texas School is Teaching Respect, Patriotism, and Community Service…and Not Just to its Students

We hate spam too, we'll never share your email address


By  | 
How One Texas School is Teaching Respect, Patriotism, and Community Service…and Not Just to its Students

By Jane Wells
     Photos by Jane Wells

During this time of year for the past 20 years, 130 students (K-8), a number of teachers, one principle, superintendent, secretary, and coach at the Morgan Mill School in the northern Texas Hill Country have prepared a Thanksgiving dinner to serve upward of 900 people. For free.

How One Texas School is Teaching Respect, Patriotism, and Community Service…and Not Just to its Students

A minimum of four days is needed to prepare the turkeys, homemade dressing, candied sweet potatoes, green beans, corn, dinner rolls and an assortment of fresh baked pies, cakes, and cobblers, which were served starting at 11 a.m. on Friday, November 20, in the school cafeteria.

Following tradition, Superintendent Dean Edwards said that the upper grades scrubbed the gym from top to bottom, including the bleachers. The younger classes focused on hand-crafting name tags, placemats, and thank-you cards and decorating the halls with their artwork.

A list of major benefactors was placed on every table. People who wish to donate could and did, but it is not expected. Hand-written invitations were sent out weeks prior to the event to local dignitaries, school board members, county and state government officials, the president of the United States, and even Mr. George Strait.

How One Texas School is Teaching Respect, Patriotism, and Community Service…and Not Just to its Students
Edwards said, “Honored guests include at least two busloads of soldiers from Fort Hood who are personally picked up and driven to the school where they will be treated like royalty.”

Principal Shirley Couch added, “It’s an opportunity for our kids to understand how important it is to be of service to their community.”

Why?

“It’s not only about giving money, it’s about giving of yourself,” Edwards added, “No matter what you give, no matter what you have, the kids need to learn they can make a difference.”

This annual dinner is their gift; the teachers, staff and administrators who believe saying thank you through giving is a lesson worth teaching. During the school year, the students practice their manners and dinner etiquette. Boys in the upper grades might wear a tie, and some of the older girls have been known to exercise their right to wear a little makeup.

Page 1 of 2:12