Lifestyle

Tackling Tinnitus: How to Handle a Buzzing or Ringing in Your Ears

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Do you have a ringing or a buzzing sound in your ears? If so, you’re among more than 30 million people in the U.S. this affects, and you may be interested in a free upcoming program. Researchers at Lamar University in Beaumont are looking for research volunteers who have what’s known as tinnitus, or a buzzing/ringing in the ear. If you’re experiencing this, you may want to volunteer for an eight-week internet-based program called Tackling Tinnitus. It can not only be an annoyance, but it can also disrupt many of your daily life activities.

Vinaya Manchaiah, Jo Mayo Endowed Professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Lamar University, recently advised, “Although there is no cure for tinnitus, research has identified strategies that can help people better manage their tinnitus. This program shares these strategies to help individuals to better manage their tinnitus.” This study lasts for an eight-week period with over 20 modules that provide coping strategies and practical tips based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. For those living with tinnitus, this information can be extremely helpful.

Tackling Tinnitus: How to Handle a Buzzing or Ringing in Your Ears

Photo: envato elements

The full study is available online and each step can be downloaded or printed for future reference. This includes videos and worksheets in order to monitor your own progress, and the information is available in both English and Spanish. It will also be guided by a trained clinician who specializes in tinnitus. Participants of the study must be a minimum of 18 years of age and have troublesome tinnitus. They must also have access to the internet. Spanish-speaking individuals are highly encouraged to participate. The purpose for the online accessibility is for convenience. The condition doesn’t differentiate between our busy Texas lifestyles! Subsequently, the study modules can be done when and where participants are most comfortable, be it at home, commuting on a train, during a lunch break, or even waiting at the airport. It’s designed to be accommodating. As the details of the experience are documented, it gives each individual the opportunity to think about it, their reading materials, and what they can use as a reference going forward.

Tackling Tinnitus: How to Handle a Buzzing or Ringing in Your Ears

Photo: envato elements

According to the Mayo Clinic, tinnitus “affects about 15 to 20 percent of people. Tinnitus isn’t a condition itself — it’s a symptom of an underlying condition, such as age-related hearing loss, ear injury or a circulatory system disorder…” but it “usually isn’t a sign of something serious.” The ear noise has been known to vary in pitch. And, those affected may have it in only one ear or they may experience it in both. In some instances, people with tinnitus have been known to hear the sound so loudly it interferes with their ability to hear other sounds or to even concentrate. It has also been known to either be present consistently, or to come and go. For more information about the Lamar University program, or to register as a participant, visit www.tacklingtinnitus.org. Details with respect to the researchers involved in the study are also available at that link.