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“The Devils” Not So Bad After All

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“The Devils” Not So Bad After All

Photo: Frank Simek Jr. III

When the river’s aesthetic value is taken into account with its reputation for being (1) prone to flash flooding, (2) difficult to navigate, and (3) zealously protected by its private landholding guardians, all elements of the age old “pleasure and pain” equation have fallen into place. Resistance to the call is futile.

“The Devils” Not So Bad After All

Photo: Frank Simek Jr. III

As their guide again reassured them of their reunion some 15 river miles downstream, the trio slid silently into the stream. Soon eager anticipation gave way to the gentle pull of the river…the journey had begun.

“The Devils” Not So Bad After All

Photo: Frank Simek Jr. III

While the Devils’ may not have gained international fame, there is no doubt that the West-Texas-like landscape presented to its travelers is world class. While unique in many ways, the Devils shares the almost mystical river quality of transporting its passengers in time and space. Perhaps Bob Marshall said it best, “Swift or smooth, broad as the Hudson or narrow enough to scrape your gunwales, every river is a world of its own, unique in pattern and personality. Each mile on a river will take you further from home than a hundred miles on a road.”

“The Devils” Not So Bad After All
Photo: Frank Simek Jr. III

Somewhat weakened by drought-induced low flow conditions, the river was not devoid of occasional reminders that it still had enough life to provide some element of danger.