Local News

7-Year-Old Canyon Lake Boy Given the Trip of a Lifetime

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A sevenyearold Canyon Lake boy is getting the trip of a lifetime, thanks to Make-A-Wish of Central & South Texas and SouthWest Water Company. The boy, Bryton, suffers from mitochondrial disease, a chronic illness that causes debilitating physical, developmental and cognitive disabilities.

An avid lover of all things Alaska, this was the obvious choice of a vacation for Bryton and his family. The family was presented with the trip at a surprise party, hosted by Water Services, Inc and Make-A-Wish of Central & South Texas at Logan’s Roadhouse in Buda this week. Along with the trip to Alaska, Bryton was also given dinosaur, wolf, and Alaska-themed gifts at the party (just a few of Bryton’s favorite things).

Making Children’s Wishes Reality

Make A Wish

Photo: Facebook/MakeAWishCSTX

“There is nothing more rewarding than connecting with members of the communities we serve and making a difference for families in need,” Gary Rose, director of operations, Texas Utilities, SouthWest Water Company, said. “This marks SouthWest Water’s ninth wish with Make-A-Wish, and we are thrilled to continue to make children’s wishes become a reality.”

“Without the support of community partners like SouthWest Water Company, gifts such as Bryton’s trip to Alaska would not be possible,” Kathrin Brewer, president & CEO of Make-A-Wish Central & South Texas, said. “We are incredibly grateful for their ongoing support.”

Affecting 1 in 4,000 People

mitochondrial disease
Photo: Facebook/unitedmitochondrialdiseasefoundation

Mitochondrial disease is an inherited chronic illness that can be present at birth or develop later in life. It causes debilitating physical, developmental, and cognitive disabilities with symptoms including poor growth; loss of muscle coordination; muscle weakness and pain; seizures; vision and/or hearing loss; gastrointestinal issues; learning disabilities; and organ failure.  It is estimated that 1 in 4,000 people has mitochondrial disease. The disease is progressive and there is no cure.

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